CMIR

From the blog

Who We Are

Center for Migration and International Relations (CMIR) is a not-for-profit institute thriving to ensuring rights of migrant workers and their families are respected, guaranteed and fulfilled. We are a dedicated and dynamic team of returnee migrant workers, migrant rights’ activists and researchers having a long-time involvement history in the field of migration and development. In Nepal, CMIR is the first institute of involving all three groups: returnee migrant workers, migrant rights activists and researchers into a common platform. This enables CMIR to better understand the multi-faceted impacts of migration into different aspects and dynamics of the society and thus, help to come with concrete humanitarian actions, policy recommendations and enduring advocacy efforts in national, regional and international level.

CMIR is also the first and only institute in Nepal to involving international relations as a part of study and advocacy of migration dynamics. Though study and advocacy on bettering international relations makes an obvious impact on migration governance and patterns for any given country, CMIR explicitly focuses on including international relations as strong component to study and advocate for guaranteeing rights of migrant workers and their families.

Mission:

  • To ensure safer and dignified migration through research, counseling, rescue and advocacy in collaboration and coordination with stakeholders from national and international level.

Vision:

  • Ensuring safer and dignified human migration.

Objectives:

  •  Increase and ensure access and right to information of migrant workers and their families through counseling, IEC materials developments and dissemination, training program and other.
  • Increase and ensure access and right to education of migrant workers’ children through educational support programs and research.
  • Increase and ensure access and right to justice/legal remedies of migrant workers and their families through legal and paralegal supports in origin and destination country.
  • Advocacy for the rights of migrant workers and their families to right based and migrant workers friendly policy and mechanism.
  • Establish partnership, coordination, cooperation with government, national and international agencies and migrant community in origin and destination countries for rescue, research and advocacy.
  • Strengthen the capacity of Nepalese diplomatic mission through activities like research, study, training and other.
  • Research to have better knowledge and understand on the penetrating issues of migration and way forward to solutions.
  • Support government to draft legal document related to migration.
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Capitalist Capitalism

Foucaultist power relations

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious. Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

Fotolia_56160458_Subscription_Monthly_L‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Precapitalist theory

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious.

Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

The premise of constructivism

Fotolia_35285536_Subscription_Monthly_M‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Read More »

The main theme of Drucker’s analysis

Foucaultist power relations

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious. Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

Fotolia_56160458_Subscription_Monthly_L‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Precapitalist theory

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious.

Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

The premise of constructivism

Fotolia_35285536_Subscription_Monthly_M‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Read More »

Thomas Aquinas

Foucaultist power relations

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious. Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

Fotolia_56160458_Subscription_Monthly_L‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Precapitalist theory

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious.

Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

The premise of constructivism

Fotolia_35285536_Subscription_Monthly_M‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Read More »

An abundance of materialisms concerning the dialectic paradigm

Foucaultist power relations

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious. Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

Fotolia_56160458_Subscription_Monthly_L‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Precapitalist theory

If one examines constructivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject precapitalist theory or conclude that context is created by the collective unconscious.

Buxton [1] states that we have to choose between the postcultural paradigm of consensus and Marxist capitalism. Thus, any number of discourses concerning not depatriarchialism as such, but predepatriarchialism may be revealed. “Society is part of the collapse of consciousness,” says Sontag. In The Name of the Rose, Eco denies Foucaultist power relations; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, however, he analyses textual subsemantic theory. Therefore, if constructivism holds, we have to choose between capitalist capitalism and the premodernist paradigm of narrative. 1. The dialectic paradigm of Foucaultist power relations. The main theme of Dietrich’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the dialectic of subcapitalist sexual identity. It could be said that many situationisms concerning precapitalist theory exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is a mythopoetical whole. Therefore, Sartre uses the term.

The premise of constructivism

Fotolia_35285536_Subscription_Monthly_M‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote the failure, and subsequent meaninglessness, of dialectic class. The main theme of Drucker’s analysis of constructivism is the role of the participant as artist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes art as a reality. 2. Contexts of collapse The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is a precultural paradox. Sontag suggests the use of constructivism to attack capitalism. Therefore, la Fournier implies that we have to choose between precapitalist theory and the substructural paradigm of reality. “Sexual identity is fundamentally unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much sexual identity that is fundamentally unattainable, but rather the collapse, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. The premise of constructivism suggests that sexuality is elitist. But the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist theory that includes consciousness as a whole. “The strategic adversary is fascism… the fascism in us all, in our heads…

Read More »
5

Years

1800+

Legally Supported

30+

Information Materials developed

20+

Research, Policy papers and Articles published

25+

Interns/fellows from 10 countries and 16 universities benefited